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Clifford Odle, 8, of Lewiston, points to the title on a "Life Cycle of a Star" poster board while Eliza Dunham ‘20, of New Haven, Conn., explains what a supernova is during the Bates College Astronomy Night Extravaganza at the Carnegie Science Hall on April 2, 2018. Dunham, along with Maeve O'Brien ‘21 of Essex, Conn., not pictured, and Jill Futter ‘21 of Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y., not pictured, used a ballon filled with a ping pong ball and another ballon filled with glitter to visually represent the difference between a type 1 and type 2 supernova, "a type 1 is a lot smaller than a type 2, and a type 2 is actually a lot bigger than the sun. A type 1 will end up as a white dwarf which is nothing really exciting-it’s like a ping pong ball basically, while a type 2 when it explodes is very bright and kind of sparkly, which is a lot cooler in my opinion," said Futter.

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Clifford Odle, 8, of Lewiston, points to the title on a "Life Cycle of a Star" poster board while Eliza Dunham ‘20, of New Haven, Conn., explains what a supernova is during the Bates College Astronomy Night Extravaganza at the Carnegie Science Hall on April 2, 2018. Dunham, along with Maeve O'Brien ‘21 of Essex, Conn., not pictured, and Jill Futter ‘21 of Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y., not pictured, used a ballon filled with a ping pong ball and another ballon filled with glitter to visually represent the difference between a type 1 and type 2 supernova, "a type 1 is a lot smaller than a type 2, and a type 2 is actually a lot bigger than the sun. A type 1 will end up as a white dwarf which is nothing really exciting-it’s like a ping pong ball basically, while a type 2 when it explodes is very bright and kind of sparkly, which is a lot cooler in my opinion," said Futter.